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, he had been governor of virginia, ambassador of france, secretary of state, vice president of the united states, member of the congress. author of the decoration of independence. it's one of the few people in english history have been evaluated or inspected as closely as thomas jefferson was before he became president of the united states. people were looking at him and saying this is the guy we want. this is the person who should be president. >> host: the opponent said this isn't the guy we want. it was a close election. >> guest: it was. it was a strange election. >> host: it was strange election. it was hard fought. he had a lot of animation. you're saying, i guess what you're really saying is that both the supporters and the opponents knew who they were talking about. >> guest: partly that. what i'm saying is that especially when parties become ideological. any democrat is going different from any republican or any democrat is going different from any federalist. if you're measuring individual leader impact you shouldn't measure the democratic you should measure agains
'reilly factor. >> greg: coming up, homework is punishment. leigh it up to france. which is a country. apparently they say homework punishs the poor kids and helps the rich. dana will explain it next on five five. if you leigh now she will eat an entire beret. ♪ ♪ is what drives us to broadcast the world's biggest events in 3d, or live to your seat high above the atlantic ocean. it's what drives us to create eco-friendly race tracks, batteries that power tomorrow's cars, nearlyndestructible laptops, and the sustainable smart towns of the future. at panasonic, we're driven to make what matters most better. just another way we're engineering a better world for you. so we created the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. our sleep professionals will help you find your sleep number setting. exclusively at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort individualized. this holiday season, give the gift that's magical: the innovative airfit adjustable pillow at special 30
nations, such as france or spain whatever, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. so he came up with all of these arguments about what he did and that is with jefferson did. >> what did you think? >> i was not a big jeffersonian after i did all of this. he was a wordsmith. he was not a good executive when he was governor of virginia. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was't famous until famous in the sense that we know historically now. so when he was running for president in the 17 nineties, he held in sulphide as the author of the declaration of independence. which in some ways he was. nobody even cared about that in the 1770s. but that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. he and john adams died on the same day. that is when the whole thing became a sainted document. it was god's handiwork that he -- that they died on the same day. >> would you have fit back in those days? >> up probably would have been a trouble maker -- i probably would have been a trouble maker. i probably also would have been somebody who had a strategic bent. i'm
to be credible to the other nations so they could gain from france or spain, and this was another reason for the declaration of independence, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. sonya, with all these arguments about what he did. that is where tempers and dead. -- so they made all these arguments. >> what did you think about jefferson? >> i did not think much. he was a words maturity was not a good governor of virginia. the british almost caught him one time. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was not famous until he was -- famous in the sense that we know him historical now -- until when he was running for president in the 17 nineties. he held himself out as the author of the declaration of independence, which in some ways he was. nobody had cared about that during 1770 s, but it helped him. that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. then when he and john adams died on the same day, july 4, 1826, and that's when the whole thing became the document that this was god's handiwork, but they died on the same day. >> knowing what you know ab
. i hadpy they jus too but my backup dsk who -- would have been the president of france if he hadn't changed a hotel chamber maid around the room in new york. that was just settled in a civil suit. he paid up big. >> i would have to say benghazi. failure of the obama administration to protect our diplomats and a ridiculous attempt to cover it up. >> dynamite. >> the cover-up has yet to be proved but petraeus has to win. i mean -- here's a career that was just going so spectacularly well. i mean just overnight another one of these sex scandals that's questionable just how bad it was for anybody outside of their families. and immediate people. >> worst political scandal of 2012 is operation fast and furious, the datf undercover operation which flooded mexico with some 2,000 illegal weapons and 1,400 still unaccounted for. the soon to be in the hands of the cartels and operation makes the u.s. government one of the largest suppliers of assault rifles to the drug cartels. we'll be right back with this and more group awards. ♪ ♪[ music ] >>> okay, best idea of 2012. pat buchanan. >>
refugee from france. he was having his own spiritual dilemmas. and when he encountered her, he saw this incredible spirituality that was sort of, um, unexpressed, and he was able to sort of draw it out of her and allow her spirituality, her mysticism, her deep devotion to jesus christ to sort of help him heal his own doubts, his own spiritual doubts. and i think together there was a confluence there, this spiritual energy, can which i think is a love story and -- on a very high-refined level. it's sort of a divine love that, say, you or i wouldn't be able to appreciate. and they had this union, i suppose, where they sort of circled each other, and he observed her, and i think she observed him. when she died at the age of 24, it was april 17, 1680, immediately after her death her body was transfigured. and there are two written accounts which are in that book right there which were part of her cause that was over in the rome. now, she's already passed away, and she was only 24 years old, and she was a recluse. she only had a couple of female friends that knew her really well but for
, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washington po " post's" claim that the senate would be better with more women. i'm not done debating that. more coming up on this program today. and we want to hear from you as well. send your e-mails to varney@foxbusiness.com and we read them on the air. and we read all of them, by the way. i've got news, clearwire
's here with me, frances scott, and i'm very thankful to the good lord and to a strong mom who believes that sometimes love has to come at the end of a switch, and she loves me a lot. and i'll tell you that along that way, that when times got tough and when i was flunking out of high school -- when i failed world geography, civics, spanish and english -- when you fail spanish and english, they don't call you bilingual, ok? they may refer to you as biignic because you can't speak any language. i will tell you that my mother did not quit on me. i also had the good fortune of meeting a meant more from chick-fil-a who taught me basic biblical principles and it has served well. our nation finds itself in a situation where we need some backbone, we need to make very difficult decisions. so often we have a conversation about how do we create enough revenue to solve the problem. i learned early in my 20's that if you have a problem with spending, there's not enough revenue to make up for it. we have a spending problem, ladies and gentlemen, in america, and not a revenue problem. so it's very di
the rest of that story. heather: then there is that. france's socialist government promising to keep fighting for higher taxes on the rich after its controversial 75% super tax was ruled unconstitutional. greg palkot is live for us in london with these details. hi, greg. >> reporter: hey, heather. you think the wrangle over higher taxes in the states is serious check out what is happening in france. just over the weekend the french constitutional court said a planned 75% tax on those earning the equivalent of $1.3 million or more a year should be thrown out as unfair. it had already been blasted by government critics as anti-entrepreneur and anti-business. one skeptic branding it as fiscal bludgeoning. the government trying to balance the budget on the backs of the rich. it sparked a anecdotal rush of high rollers from the french exits including a well-known actor gerard depardieu who will move next door to belgium. french president hollande is not really defeated. court through a tax out more on a technicality. the government is planning to issue a reworded tax bill soon and there a
a deal on the fiscal cliff? we are going to debate that plus, france says no to high taxes on the rich. could the united states learn something from that? we'll analyze that when we come back. ♪ need not wonder why ♪ ♪ no tim ♪ ♪ you're a heartbreaker, dream maker ♪ >> welcome back to a sunday prime time edition of "the five." and as the clock ticks down and going over the so-called fiscal cliff. no deal he yet, but there is some finger pointing going on. >> i'm concerned about the lack of urgency here. i think we all know we're running out of time. this is far too much at stake for political gamesmanship. we need to protect the american families and businesses from this looming tax hike. everyone agrees that that option is necessary. >> i will say this, i think that the republican leader has shown absolutely good faith, but it's just that we're apart on some pretty big issues. >> and senator reid-- >> this has been a blame game from the very, very beginning and dana, we saw today president obama take to the sunday shows and spend the whole time blaming republicans. if we
intervention from the u.s. and france to help him push back the rebel advance. the u.s. says it is a pact with its embassy as a precautionary safety measure. in india, a 17-year-old girl was gang raped has committed suicide after being pressured by police to drop the case and marry one of her attackers. the girl's death comes amidst growing national outrage over a spate of gang rapes ignored by india's police, including one on a public bus in delhi. on thursday, protests against rape in india continued nationwide. >> they are doing nothing about it. [indiscernible] it is unacceptable and completely humiliating. >> according to india's national crime registry, one woman is raped every 20 minutes in india. russian president vladimir putin has signed into law a ban on u.s. citizens adopting russian children. the ban is seen as a retaliatory move after president obama signed a law denying u.s. visas and bank accounts to russian officials linked to the death of imprisoned whistleblower sergei magnitsky. it will take effect january 1st and likely add a new strain to u.s.-russian ties. retired u
's ceo says applications were coming in at a rate of two per minute. and if you travel to france, speaking of traveling, and get a craving burger king has opened a brampbl at branch at the airport. now if you're traveling to france, you can have a whopper, although i don't think you're a vegetarian are you? >> yes, i am. but you've got to wonder what they saw in their research that made them go back to france. >> i think it's just globalization. you have more people traveling. you have americans -- it's widely known that americans are all over the market. bigger market and place to go. not too terribly surprising. >> lisa sylvester, thanks. >>> new englanders are shoveling snow while southerners are shir v shivering. the latest on what is a winter storm and what is coming next. what's that in reindeer-power? [ laughs ] [ pencil scratches ] [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. get the best offer of the year -- 0% apr financing for 60 months plus $1,000 holiday bonus cash. plus trade up for an additional $1,000 trade-in allowance. hurry. bonus cash ends january 2nd. i just serve
, japan, france-- why are their gun deaths so much lower than ourselves? i mean, john howard, a very conservative prime minister-- former prime minister of australia said we don't want the american disease in australia. why is it that all these other countries don't seem to have this problem? >> well, they have soo they have a homicide problem. they have a violent crime problem. in britain, it's four times what ours is. they don't have as many guns. that doesn't prevent killing. it doesn't prevent mayhem. it doesn't prevent violent crime. >> schieffer: you don't really believe people armed with baseball pats batcan somehow kill more people than people armed with guns. >> in this country, more people are beaten to death than are killed by long guns. >> schieffer: the people who are surviving gunshot wounds now, it's because we have better medical help, david, for the same reason-- >> that's good. >> schieffer: yes, it's good. it's the same reason more of our people are surviving on the battlefields, but that's not the end of it. why do you-- why are you so against-- i know the things
the way other countries do. so we're essentially subsidizing like france and germany, for example because their governments have worked out a way to negotiate prices. so medicare, for example gets to set rates on payments to doctors and hospitals but doesn't have any power to negotiate rates on medical devices, drugs or durable medical equipment. so we don't have a market place wherein we have any leverage. ultimately, we pay more than other countries do for those things because we don't have any say. >> stephanie: also, you were talking about cost basically being arbitrary. you can pay $4,000 at one hospital. $15,000 at another. >> it should be infuriating. people should be angry about this. we have no idea what things really cost in this country. medically. so if you go to get a procedure or you have an emergency for god forbid and you end up in an emergency room, you're not price checking. you're going -- you're going to get fixed or healed. >> stephanie: i have a gushing head injury. maybe i should go shop
in europe is 25%. like france is not where we want to be on tax policy. the canadians are at 17%. where you have high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and on the individual side. we will over time take the corporate rate to 25 from 35. because it will be better for growth, we will actually have more revenue for the government and not less. with government growth at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over last 20 years or obama over last four, you do that for decades, the federal cabinet raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government at such strong, robust and jobs-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats have taken the opposite direction over the last four years. that's why we are in this mess. host: now to an independent in georgia, al. if i would push the right button. sorry about that. al, good morning. caller: good morning. the last time you were on c- span, i managed to get through. it was on the heels of you going to atlanta and to chast
to reduce that to 25%. the reason is the average business tax in europe is 25%. like france is not where we want to be on tax policy. the canadians are at 17%. where you have high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and on the individual side. we will over time take the corporate rate to 25 from 35. because it will be better for growth, we will actually have more revenue for the government and not less. with government growth at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over last 20 years or obama over last four, you do that for decades, the federal cabinet raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government at such strong, robust and jobs-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats have taken the opposite direction over the last four years. that's why we are in this mess. host: now to al, an independent in georgia. if i would push the right button. sorry about that. al, good morning. caller: good morning. the last time you were on c- span, i managed to get thr
france to tour deshame, lance armstrong's name is tarnished over doping allegations that haunted him for much of his cycling career. he is stripped of all seven titles. hulk hogan gets his hands outside the ring. his sex tape going viral this year. elmo puppeteer kevin clash resigning after 28 years, accused of having sex with underage boys. >> 9 clash 9 clash 9. >> and 9/9/9 all but forgotten. herr maine cane -- herman cain ending a presidential bid saying cheating rumors were ruining his marriage. arnold schwarzenegger with very public details on his cheating scandal. the 22-year-old kristin stewart admitting guessing too cozy with her director. john travolta has two male therapists file lawsuits against him claiming sexual assault. and the paparazzi getting, well, up close and personal with a topless sun-bathing kate middleton. >> what do you have to say about the verdict? >> 2012, one of the most infamous cases of sexual abuse. former penn state assistant coach jerry sandusky sentenced to at least 30 years behind bars for sexually abusing young boys. the late -- [inaudible] of th
, and spain and italy, and france. they all grow slow of the they have extremely high unemployment rates. we would have a slow economy and high unemployment forever if we taxed ourselves like that. gregg: all right. >> this idea that somehow you can't tax the middle class or we won't, it's impossible. if we keep --. gregg: that is a bad idea, right, i get it. i get it. vat. that i get. >> value-added tax is the worst thing. gregg: brian, what is the solution? >> yeah. i, well, if i were king for a day and told to make the economy grow faster, i would cut the size of our federal government. we need to cut spending everywhere because, the best our economy has done in the last 30 years is during the '80s and '90s. that's when ronald reagan and bill clinton cut spending. i would take the clinton tax rates, right now, i would take them. gregg: really. >> they won't hurt the economy, if, i got clinton's spending. he spent one-third less on federal government than barack obama is today, one-third less. we've increased the size of the government by over 33%. gregg:er hereby announce you king for a d
is even further down. >> oh, no. >> france is down as well. france is just a notch above. >> so why is the united states and germany both number 16? >> well, i think it's to do partly with the economic prospects which are not so great. also to do with things like crime rate in the united states, people like to feel safe and they feel safer in some of these european countries and australia does work very well, too. >> what's great britain's problem? why are they -- >> many problems in britain. not the least we have not such great economic prospects prepared for a lot of these countries. and we have high rates of social problems as well. >> a lot of it is to do with social cohesion. when you look at the countries in the top, switzerland, australia, denmark, singapore, they all have a strong sense of national and social cohesion and i would say one of the questions that really affects quality of life in a country today is do people feel they're pulling together and feel part of society or not? >> is there a consistency about the top countries, what they're doing in terms of economic pl
for broke regiment. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded a distinguished service cross of which was later upgraded to the medal of honor, our highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduated from the university of hawaii and the george washington university law school. daniel inouye won election to the united states house of representatives as the united -- the new state's first congressman. he is currently serving his eighth term in the united states senate. other people we have spoken to have talked about the first time they were sworn in as a member of congress. in 1959, you became the first member from hawaii. what was that like when you work first on the floor of the house of representatives? >> i spent some time in washington before this. i went to law school. i had never been on the floor of the chamber. it was an awesome experience for me to be among a multitude of giants and have teh speaker of the house swear me in. it was a simple ceremony, but i will never
that president obama is considering appointing her to the ambassador of the united kingdom or france. cnn correspondent and resident fashionista, hope you don't mind, you are, alina cho in new york. >> always flattering me. >> why would anna wintour want the job? she's kind of busy as it is. >> she most certainly is very busy. you're talking about the most powerful person in fashion, brooke, as you know. this is a story that has been out there for quite some time. it was long rumored, talked about quite a bit in fashion circles during the campaign. and it was said that she might be given the post of u.s. ambassador to the uk. and anna wintour after all is british. and the guessing game even began as to who might replace her at vogue. those rumors over the past several months actually had died down, brooke, until today. but you can imagine why people are talking about this. listen, as one writer put it, the tea party has the coke brothers. mitt romney had bain capital, but only president obama has anna wintour. this is a woman who was one of the president's most powerful boundlers of donat
. >>> is president obama considering the vogue editor ambassador to the united kingdom or france? she's among a handful of top obama fund-raisers interested in the post. she's said to have inspired the film "the devil wears prada." that would be very interesting. >> she knows both cities very well. >> and she has quite a reputation for being a tough negotiator. >> thank you. >>> tony blair is standing by to join us live. we're going to talk about the international suspicions that syria's regime may be preparing to use chemical weapons against its own people. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. he opened up jake's very private world. at first, jake's family thought they
in this country comes together in france in agreement that avoids this deficit clips that were hanging on. >> from the va -- [inaudible] >> one of the big problems of disability claims that the medical records issue. [inaudible] to improve the medical records. secretary panetta, something that helps to have a better physicalism maybe this service will have a better record of what their problems are. what you do for the people to know, hundreds of thousands of people appending claims no and are being postponed because of the fact that medical records either to history too complicated to come by and prove whether they have a disability. >> i think production demonstrates we are working these cases aren't immediately available to develop them so we have a fully developed claim and can make judgments. we do that better reader than that a million claims a year big challenge for us is to get a million plus and returned coming in the door. that's where the automation system called veterans benefits management system is key to our ability to do with those numbers. we push a million claims that the door an
nations combined. many of our allies like france and england. the united states is a global power with global responsibilities. it is a real sense of debate. our budgets tends to come down after we fight wars. what is the appropriate role for the united states military in the world? maybe allies can take care of this and maybe we do not need to do. host: how much do we spend? guest: about $600 billion a year from year to year. it is hard to estimate countries like china because they are now pricing things the same way. they have large land forces and they are not deployed across the world. submarines and missiles. china is probably number one on the list. host: this from twitter. guest: that refers to overseas contingency operations. this is a fund that paid for the wars in iraq. it is about $88 billion in that account. there is a pentagon and washington funny math. some people say if the project out, we will save all this money. i wrote a report about saving $1 trillion. most of our troops will be out of afghanistan by 2014. nobody expects it will spend this level of money going
. denmark tops the list. canada at 9. u.s. at 8. france at 7 and japan a measly 4. look at the top tax rates in these countries. americans pay 41.7% when you factor in federal, state and local taxes. dans are happy but pay more, 48%. why? in part because their taxes get them free health care and post secondary education. so, perhaps a more constructive conversation should center on how much we expect to benefit from government services, and how much we're willing to pay for those services. now, the negotiation between speaker boehner and president obama have given us a new term over which to obsess, chain cpi. it would change the way the federal government calculates inflation and those benefits that are tied to it. normally every year both wages and prices go up. the consumer price index or cpi measures how much prices go up by tracking a basket of goods that americans typically buy. this is used to calculate cost of living adjustments on social security. checks pay a little more each year as prices for what we need go up. one potential flaw in the system is that cpi assumes people don't ch
to fight against the tax increase for the wealthiest people. they take a ski vacation in france and a cost $20,000. they spend money like it is garbage. cheerleading for tax breaks for people who do not need it. they have admitted they do not need it. the republicans and the democrats are not facing the key issue with our budget, which is medical cost. it is insanity we do not hear enough and i wish c-span would have more programs dealing with all of the options that could lessen the burden on the government and the taxpayer for the medical costs. i believe that in medicare buy- in -- i have 10 years left to go until medicare. i pay $620 a month for my health care. that is a lot of money. i would give that to the government and would usn't use t $100 or $200 a year. host: that is an important issue. we will focus more as the affordable care act t kicks in. for the suggestion -- thank you for the suggestion. the deficit is close to $16.4 trillion. this is part of the debate we will see at the start of the new congress. the so-called fiscal cliff was coined by ben bernanke. the story from "r
stay on the pathway we're currently on we're headed to the nanny state which is france and greece. that concerns me a great deal and the country will not be able to deal with the leader of the free world if we continue on that pathway. >> what would that look like for the average citizen? >> the average citizen more and more their life would be dependent on uncle sam. the difference between america and the rest of the world is our founding fathers placed the highest priority on individual enterprise and individual spirit. if people are willing to say my dependent upon my own willingness to work hard and impact the process we will continue to have that driving force that makes us the strongest country in the world. if we're not careful, we will walk away from it and soon, unfortunately, we'll be like france. >> do you have any sense there is a generational sense on views how the government should serve the public among younger americans than it is among baby boomers and older? >> i'm hopeful we can convince the cross section of the younger generation that their contribution to our
and are finding themselves in very significant fiscal problems. france has to be the poster child of all, although maybe greece, i guess, would take number one. >> we do know that the u.s. spends a larger percentage of its gdp on health care than any of the other developed nations by a fairly significant amount. so really tackling that underlying issue of what percent of our economy is going to health care in general is really the key issue, and we should be focused on that, i think, much more than the federal government's portion of it. and in this case where you have a proposal that would actually increase the share of gdp going to health care is taking us in the wrong direction. >> that is assuming that medicare spending equals medicare costs. and, again, as somebody who actually ran the program, i'm not assuming that. >> do you want to do that one? sure. >> david, this one is definitely for you specifically and aarp. the question is this: what scoreable savings proposals does aarp support for medicare beyond just better care coordination? does aarp support means testing, combining parts a and
and finding themselves in very significant fiscal problems. france has to be the poster child of all, although maybe greece would take number one. >> we to know that the u.s. spends a larger percentagpercentag e of gdp on health care than any other developed nation by fairly significant amount. really tackling that underlying issue of what percent of our economy is going to health care in general is really the key issue and we should be focused on that much more than the federal government's portion of it and in this case we have a proposal that would actually increase the share of gdp going to help her, taking us in the wrong direction. >> that is assuming that medicare spending with medicare costs and again as somebody usa ran the program -- [inaudible] >> this one is definitely for you specifically and aarp. the question is this. what scorable savings proposal does aarp support or for medicare, beyond better coordination does aarp support means testing, combining parts a and beet are sharing our medigap reform or anything else? >> i think it's important to remind everybody that we recently
protect their own ground forces? is there something about germany and italy and france and spain and england and japan that renders them genetically incapable of having their own air forces? i know we were told, well, we have to stay in iraq and afghanistan because they don't have any air force. well, neither do the people attacking them. the next thing we are told is, well, we need to protect the u.s. from a nuclear attack. i agree. we have a nuclear capacity that far exceeds any potential combination of enemies. we had during the height of the cold war the triad. we could destroy the soviet union and they had a capacity to go after us by missiles, submarines or the strategic air command. i have a proposal, sometimes i'm kidding, this time i'm not. can we not go to the pentagon and say, you know what? now that there is no more soviet union, there is a much weaker russia, and i agree, russia won a war against georgia. they won a war against the country of georgia. i think the way we have armed the state of georgia, i'm not sure what the outcome would be if that was the war. but r
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